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Disease Profile

Boomerang dysplasia

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.
<1 / 1 000 000

< 331

US Estimated

< 514

Europe Estimated

Age of onset

Neonatal

ICD-10

Q87.1

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Dwarfism with short, bowed, rigid limbs and characteristic facies; Boomerang-like skeletal dysplasia

Categories

Congenital and Genetic Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases

Summary

The following summary is from Orphanet, a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.
orphanet

Orpha Number: 1263

Definition
Boomerang dysplasia (BD) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism, dislocated joints, club feet, distinctive facies and diagnostic x-ray findings of underossified and dysplastic long tubular bones, with a boomerang-like bowing.

Epidemiology
The prevalence of BD is unknown.

Clinical description
Affected neonates are stillborn or die rapidly after birth and present clinically with severe short-limbed dwarfism, dislocated hip, knee and elbow joints, club feet and proviso born alive have severe cardio respiratory failure. Facial dysmorphism includes midface hypoplasia and cleft palate. Boomerang dysplasia clinically differs from AOI and AOIII because of the boomerang shaped bowing of the femur and occasionally observed encephalocele and omphalocele.

Etiology
BD results from missense mutations or small in-frame deletions in the FLNB gene reported in exons 2-5, normally expected to translate full length but biochemically abnormal filamin B protein.

Diagnostic methods
Diagnosis can be confirmed from skeletal radiographs, chondro-osseous histopathology and genetic testing. Distinctive radiographic findings are similar to AOI but, BD presents with a more severe deficiency in mineralization, with non-ossification of certain segments of limbs and vertebrates, and a boomerang-like shape of some long tubular bones.

Differential diagnosis
Comprises other skeletal dysplasias with severe short-limbed dwarfism such as achondrogenesis, campomelic dysplasia, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, achondroplasia, metatropic dysplasia, Roberts syndrome, short ribpolydactyly syndrome and thanatophoric dysplasia. Additional differential diagnosis includes diseases associated with impaired ossification such achondrogenesis, hypophosphatasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta (see these terms).

Antenatal diagnosis
The prenatal diagnosis of BD is difficult to ascertain by ultrasound. Ultrasound shows thoracic hypoplasia, limb shortening, delayed ossification of spine and appendicular segments and possibly joint dislocations, similar to AOI and AOIII. Boomerang-shape morphology some long tubular bones may be diagnosed prenatally by 3DCT scan.

Prognosis
Prognosis is poor, as the condition is lethal in utero.

Visit the Orphanet disease page for more resources.

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of tibia morphology
Abnormality of the shankbone
Abnormality of the shinbone

[ more ]

0002992
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the fibula
Absent/small calf bone
Absent/underdeveloped calf bone

[ more ]

0006492
Growth hormone deficiency
0000824
Micromelia
Smaller or shorter than typical limbs
0002983
Narrow chest
Low chest circumference
Narrow shoulders

[ more ]

0000774
Poorly ossified vertebrae
0100856
Severe short-limb dwarfism
0008890
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of femur morphology
Abnormality of the thighbone
0002823
Abnormality of the humerus
0003063
Abnormality of the metacarpal bones
Abnormality of the long bone of hand
0001163
Abnormality of the radius
0002818
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature
Absent/small abdominal wall muscles
Absent/underdeveloped abdominal wall muscles

[ more ]

0010318
Aplasia/Hypoplasia of the lungs
Absent/small lungs
Absent/underdeveloped lungs

[ more ]

0006703
Cryptorchidism
Undescended testes
Undescended testis

[ more ]

0000028
Finger syndactyly
0006101
Hydrops fetalis
0001789
Omphalocele
0001539
Polyhydramnios
High levels of amniotic fluid
0001561
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of the ulna
0002997
Percent of people who have these symptoms is not available through HPO
Absent radius
Missing outer large bone of forearm
0003974
Autosomal dominant inheritance
0000006
Fibular aplasia
Absent calf bone
0002990
Hypoplastic iliac body
0008824
Hypoplastic nasal septum
Decreased size of nasal septum
Decreased size of septum of nose
Small nasal septum
Small septum of nose

[ more ]

0005104
Neonatal death
Neonatal lethal
0003811
Severe short stature
Dwarfism
Proportionate dwarfism
Short stature, severe

[ more ]

0003510
Underdeveloped nasal alae
Underdeveloped tissue around nostril
0000430
Wide nasal bridge
Broad nasal bridge
Broad nasal root
Broadened nasal bridge
Increased breadth of bridge of nose
Increased breadth of nasal bridge
Increased width of bridge of nose
Increased width of nasal bridge
Nasal bridge broad
Wide bridge of nose
Widened nasal bridge

[ more ]

0000431

Diagnosis

Making a diagnosis for a genetic or rare disease can often be challenging. Healthcare professionals typically look at a person’s medical history, symptoms, physical exam, and laboratory test results in order to make a diagnosis. The following resources provide information relating to diagnosis and testing for this condition. If you have questions about getting a diagnosis, you should contact a healthcare professional.

Testing Resources

  • The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) provides information about the genetic tests for this condition. The intended audience for the GTR is health care providers and researchers. Patients and consumers with specific questions about a genetic test should contact a health care provider or a genetics professional.

Learn more

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

In-Depth Information

  • GeneReviews provides current, expert-authored, peer-reviewed, full-text articles describing the application of genetic testing to the diagnosis, management, and genetic counseling of patients with specific inherited conditions.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Boomerang dysplasia. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.