Rare Pulmonology News

Disease Profile

Congenital Zika syndrome

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

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ICD-10

#N/A

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Zika syndrome

Categories

Viral infections

Summary

Congenital Zika syndrome is caused by exposure to the Zika virus before birth. This may happen if the mother is infected from a mosquito bite or through sexual contact with an affected partner. Signs and symptoms of congenital Zika syndrome include birth defects (like small head size) and other health and development problems.[1][2] Zika virus outbreaks are currently occurring in many countries.[3] Vaccines to prevent Zika virus infection are being researched. The CDC recommends that pregnant women consider postponing travel to Zika-affected areas. People living in or traveling to areas where Zika virus is found should take steps to prevent mosquito bites. Those who have traveled to Zika-affected areas may wish to take steps to prevent sexual transmission of the Zika virus.[4] Babies with congenital Zika syndrome benefit from special medical care to address their healthcare needs.[2]

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Maculopapular exanthema
0040186
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of the cerebrospinal fluid
0002921
Arthralgia
Joint pain
0002829
Arthritis
Joint inflammation
0001369
Conjunctivitis
Pink eye
0000509
Fever
0001945
Headache
Headaches
0002315
Increased circulating IgM level
0003496
Myalgia
Muscle ache
Muscle pain

[ more ]

0003326
Pruritus
Itching
Itchy skin
Skin itching

[ more ]

0000989
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Ankle swelling
0001785
Edema
Fluid retention
Water retention

[ more ]

0000969
Transient hearing impairment
0012779
Vomiting
Throwing up
0002013
Wrist swelling
0001225
1%-4% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of the optic disc
0012795
Absent foveal reflex
0030825
Acute demyelinating polyneuropathy
0007131
Chorioretinal atrophy
0000533
Congenital intracerebral calcification
0006906
Encephalitis
Brain inflammation
0002383
Intrauterine growth retardation
Prenatal growth deficiency
Prenatal growth retardation

[ more ]

0001511
Iris coloboma
Cat eye
0000612
Lens subluxation
Partially dislocated lens
0001132
Macular atrophy
0007401
Meningitis
0001287
Microcephaly
Abnormally small skull
Decreased circumference of cranium
Decreased size of skull
Reduced head circumference
Small head circumference

[ more ]

0000252
Myelitis
Inflammation of spinal cord
0012486
Optic disc hypoplasia
0007766
Retinal pigment epithelial mottling
0007814
Spontaneous abortion
0005268
Subcutaneous hemorrhage
Bleeding below the skin
0001933
Thrombocytopenia
Low platelet count
0001873

Diagnosis

Making a diagnosis for a genetic or rare disease can often be challenging. Healthcare professionals typically look at a person’s medical history, symptoms, physical exam, and laboratory test results in order to make a diagnosis. The following resources provide information relating to diagnosis and testing for this condition. If you have questions about getting a diagnosis, you should contact a healthcare professional.

Testing Resources

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has information on diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a feature which allows individuals to find their state health department.

    Treatment

    The resources below provide information about treatment options for this condition. If you have questions about which treatment is right for you, talk to your healthcare professional.

    Management Guidelines

      Organizations

      Support and advocacy groups can help you connect with other patients and families, and they can provide valuable services. Many develop patient-centered information and are the driving force behind research for better treatments and possible cures. They can direct you to research, resources, and services. Many organizations also have experts who serve as medical advisors or provide lists of doctors/clinics. Visit the group’s website or contact them to learn about the services they offer. Inclusion on this list is not an endorsement by GARD.

      Organizations Providing General Support

        Learn more

        These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

        Where to Start

        • You can obtain general information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control measures to improve the health of the people of the United States. The CDC has updated information and videos on the Zika virus.
        • March of Dimes has information on Congenital Zika syndrome.

          In-Depth Information

          • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.

            References

            1. Congenital Zika Syndrome & Other Birth Defects. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Page last reviewed: November 27, 2017; https://www.cdc.gov/pregnancy/zika/testing-follow-up/zika-syndrome-birth-defects.html. Accessed 12/27/2017.
            2. Congenital Zika syndrome. March of Dimes. November 28, 2017; https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/congenital-zika-syndrome.aspx. Accessed 12/27/2017.
            3. Areas with Zika. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). February 9, 2016; https://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html.
            4. How to Protect Yourself. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). March 18, 2016; https://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/protect-yourself.html.