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Disease Profile

Idiopathic edema

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

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ICD-10

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Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Idiopathic cyclic edema; Idiopathic orthostatic edema; Fluid retention syndrome;

Summary

Idiopathic edema is a common cause of fluid retention and swelling (edema) in women.[1] "Idiopathic" means that the cause of this condition is unknown. Idiopathic edema occurs in the absence of heart, kidney, or liver disease. It is often associated with diabetes, obesity, and emotional problems. The edema may develop periodically or it may persist over time. Swelling of the face, hands, and legs can develop rapidly, and affected individuals typically experience significant changes in their weight over the course of a day. Treatment often includes a low sodium and carbohydrate diet as well as cessation of diuretic therapy (if warranted).[1][2]

Treatment

Most individuals with idiopathic edema experience a decrease in swelling and fluid retention with the introduction of a low sodium, low carbohydrate diet. For individuals already taking diuretics, a brief discontinuation may result in symptom improvement as well. Individuals who do not respond to initial treatment may be difficult to treat; however, other therapies such as use of hypertension medications (ACE inhibitors) have shown success in some cases.[2]

Learn more

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.

In-Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Idiopathic edema. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

References

  1. Ely JW, Osheroff JA, Chambliss ML, Ebell MH. J Am Board Fam Med. 2006; 19:148-160. https://www.jabfm.org/cgi/content/full/19/2/148. Accessed 12/9/2008.
  2. Richard H. Stens. Idiopathic Edema. UpToDate. August 03, 2015; https://www.uptodate.com/contents/idiopathic-edema.

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